Hepatitis C


© 1986 - excerpt from Natural Liver Therapy

TABLE 9:
Classification Of Viral Hepatitis And Associated Viruses

HEPATITIS TYPE MAIN METHODS OF TRANSMISSION COMMON OUTCOME
A (HAV, infectious hepatitis) Contamination of food, etc. with fecal matter from infected person Often resolves completely after 4 to 8 weeks; usually does not become chronic
B (HBV, serum hepatitis) Contaminated blood transfusions; shared needles associated with intravenous drug use Often less favorable than type A; can be fatal in 10 to 10% of cases in the elderly and after blood transfusions; can become chronic in 10 to 15% of cases
C (HCV, hepatitis C) Shared needles or contaminated blood transfusion; sexual transmission rate low but possible Irregular course; patient is often asymptomatic for years; can lead to chronic hepatitis
D (delta agent) This virus is closely associated with HBV Exists only concurrent with hepatitis B; causes extremely severe symptoms; may be an important cause of hepatitis worldwide



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